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NASA, USGS, and NSF Respond to White House OSTP Open Access Memo

On March 18, the National Science Foundation (NSFannounced the publication of its plan—Today's Data, Tomorrow's Discoveries—to promote and expand public access to the results of NSF-sponsored research. This announcement follows those given by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in response to the White House OSTP open access memo published in February 2013.

NSF states that accepted manuscripts or versions of record must be publicly available in an approved repository within 12 months of publication. Availability signifies that any user can download, read, and analyze the data free of charge. This will apply to new awards resulting from proposals submitted, or due, on or after the effective date of the Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide that will be issued in January 2016.

The responses of the three organizations can be accessed below:

 – NASA Plan: Increasing Access to the Results of Scientific Research
 – Data Management Policy References: What the U.S. Geological Survey Manual Says…
 – NSF’s Public Access Plan: Today’s Data, Tomorrow’s Discoveries

LANCE AMSR2 Near Real-time Data Made Available

The NASA Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) AMSR2 Processing Center at the Global Hydrology Resource Center (WDS Regular Member) in Huntsville, Alabama would like to announce the availability of its first AMSR2 near real-time dataset, NRT AMSR2 L2B Global Swath GSFC Profiling Algorithm 2010: Surface Precipitation, Wind Speed over Ocean, Water Vapor over Ocean and Cloud Liquid Water over Ocean. These LANCE AMSR2 near real-time products, with noted limitations, are generated and available to registered users via HTTPS with an average latency of less than 3 hours. More information about LANCE AMSR2 near real-time data is available here.

COAR Roadmap: Future Directions for Repository Interoperability

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) has announced the publication of the COAR Roadmap: Future Directions for Repository Interoperability. This document is the culmination of over a year’s work to identify priority issues for repository interoperability, and identifies important trends and their associated action points for the repository community.

Scholarly communication is undergoing fundamental changes, with new requirements for open access to research outputs, new forms of peer-review, and alternative methods for measuring impact. In parallel, technical developments, especially in communication and interface technologies, facilitate bi-directional data exchange across related applications and systems. The success of repository services in the future will thus depend on the seamless alignment of the diverse stakeholders at the local, national, and international level.

WGMS Publish Latest Glacier Mass Budget Results

The World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS; WDS Regular Member) have published the latest glacier mass budget results on its website. These results were compiled from the 2014 call-for-data, which covered the observation period of the hydrological year 2012/13. In addition, WGMS has introduced near-time reporting from its 'reference' glaciers (those having more than 30 years of continued observations) to provide a preliminary estimate for the glacier budgets for 2014.

Nature Makes All Articles Free to View

Publisher Macmillan has announced that all research papers from Nature and 48 other journals in its Nature Publishing Group division will be made free to read in a proprietary screen-view format that can be annotated but not copied, printed or downloaded. The ReadCube platform will be used to host and display read-only versions of the articles' PDFs, which can also be saved to a free desktop version of the software.

This content-sharing policy, marks an attempt to let scientists freely read and share articles while preserving income from subscription fees. Under the policy, subscribers can share any paper they have access to through a link to a read-only version of the paper’s PDF that can be viewed via a web browser. Anyone can subsequently repost and share the link, and many media outlets and blogs will also be able to share them.

Click here for the full article by Richard Van Noorden (, 02 December 2014).